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Syllabus | B. Tech. Electronics & Communication Engineering | Digital Communication

13040605 Digital Communication L T P C
Version1.1 Date of Approval: Jun 06, 2013 3 1 0 3
Pre-requisites//Exposure Analog Communication
co-requisites  

 Course Objectives

The student will learn and understand

  1. Difference between analog and digital communication systems, and compare their respective advantages and disadvantages.
  2. Role of Digital Modulation and Demodulation techniques in different application.

Course Outcomes

The students will be able to

  1. Explain the meaning and significance of the following: Shannon’s channel capacity theorem, super-heterodyne receiver, multiplexing and multiple access
  2. Apply the sampling theorem to quantify the fundamental relationships between channel “bandwidth” (in hertz), digital symbol rate, and bit rate (in bits/sec).
  3. Understand the concept of Spread Spectrum techniques and Multiple Access Techniques.

Catalog Description

Digital Communication implies transfer of discrete data over a point to point or point to multipoint channel. This course will introduce students to the concept of analog digitization using PCM, maximum-likelihood design, digital modulation and demodulation techniques, and performance of digital communication systems using error probability. Student will learn about multiple access techniques after completion of this course.

Text Books

  1. Simon Haykin, “Digital Communication”, John Wiley,edition- 2009, ISBN 0-471-17869-1.
  2. Bernard Sklar, “Digital Communication”, 2nd Edition, Pearson Education,edition- 2006, ISBN-10: 0130847887 

Reference Books

  1. John.G. Proakis, “Fundamentals of Communication Systems”, Pearson Education, 2006, ISBN 978-81-317-05735
  2. Amitabha Bhattacharya, “Digital Communications”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2006, ISBN: 9780070591172
  3. Herbert Taub & Donald L Schilling – Principles of Communication Systems (3rd Edition) – Tata McGraw Hill, 2008, ISBN 0070648115.
  4. Michael. B. Purrsley, “Introduction to Digital Communication”, Pearson Education, 2006, ISBN 978-0-07-2957 I6-7,4th edition.

Course Content

Unit I: Communication System & Information Theory               9 lecture hours

Introduction to Digital Communication; Geometric representation of Signals, Bandwidth , Mathematical Models of Communication Channel. Information and Channel Capacity, Entropy, Discrete and Continuous Channels,  Fano and Huffman’s Coding. Overview of Sampling, Quantization – Uniform and Non-uniform (A-law & μ-law), Encoding Techniques for Analog Sources. Classification of line codes, characteristics and power spectra of line codes.

Unit – II: Baseband Transmission                                                   7 Lecture hours

Baseband data Transmission Systems: Baseband and Bandpass transmission through AWGN channel, Coherent and noncoherent receiver structures,  Error Probability, Pulse Shaping, M-ary Signaling Schemes,  Matched Filter, Equalization, ISI, Eye Pattern analysis, Symbol Synchronization.

 Unit – III:Modulation Schemes                                                                   7 Lecture hours

Digital Modulation Schemes, ASK, PSK, FSK and QAM systems, Probability of Error in Digital Modulation Schemes, Continuous Phase Carrier Modulation, Differential modulation schemes, receiver structure and error performance, Performance comparison of modulation schemes

 Unit – IV: Speech Coding Techniques                                                        6 Lecture hours

Adaptive Delta Modulation, Speech coding, Linear Predictive Coding, Subband Coding, Adaptive Transform Coding, Comparison of speech encoding techniques.

Unit – V: Spread Spectrum & Multiple Access Techniques                     9 Lecture hours

Introduction – Generation of PN Sequences – Properties of PN Sequences – Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum – Frequency Hopped Spectrum. Introduction to Multiple Access – TDM/TDMA – FDM/FDMA – CDMA – SDMA – OFDM/OFDMA .

 Mode of Evaluation: The theory and lab performance of students are evaluated separately.

 

  Theory Laboratory Theory and laboratory
Components Internal SEE Internal SEE
Marks 50 50 50 50
Total Marks 100 100
Scaled Marks 75 25 100

 

 

Relationship between the Course Outcomes (COs) and Program Outcomes (POs)

Mapping between Cos and POs
Sl. No. Course Outcomes (COs) Mapped Programme Outcomes
1 Explain the meaning and significance of the following: Shannon’s channel capacity theorem, super-heterodyne receiver, multiplexing and multiple access. 1,2
2 Apply the sampling theorem to quantify the fundamental relationships between channel “bandwidth” (in hertz), digital symbol rate, and bit rate (in bits/sec). 3,4
3 Understand the concept of Spread Spectrum techniques and Multiple Access Techniques. 5,9

 

    Engineering Knowledge Problem analysis Design/development of solutions Conduct investigations of complex problems Modern tool usage The engineer and society Environment and sustainability Ethics Individual or team work Communication Project management and finance Life-long Learning
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
TEC321 Digital Communication 3 2 2 2 2       2      

1=addressed to small extent

2= addressed significantly

3=major part of course

Theory  The theory of this course is used to evaluate the program outcome PO(2)
  Lab  The laboratory of this course is used to evaluate the program outcome PO(4)
ADMISSIONS 2021